Redactions and “Everything Goes”

Interesting example [below] of redaction in a web page article that I suspect is to block content from non-subscribers. Or perhaps they need to just have you sign up, etc. Don’t know right now. Haven’t researched the site yet. Not really sure if I want to.

Screen shot [photo] below is a simple example that appears to be just a picture, like a Portable Network Graphic (*.png) or some other web friendly format

Here’s the link [URL] to the article:

What is the difference between an undergraduate and a graduate degree

Photo of the sample [image] below, snagged with the Start+S (OneNote required) keystroke combination.

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Redactions are of interest to me because I first learned about what they really are from learning about the word processor Microsoft Word and supporting it from basic user functions to VBA (programming code) and macros. But you see them from time to time on television and in media coverage over court trials.

Only bad thing about this sample is that it’s not exactly because I’m mainly looking for journalism samples from media coverage of court trials where there’s redaction. But you can also just search the web. Good example would be of a 60 minutes interview with redactions, if there’s ones out there you can sample in a blog or something. Just something I can research later. Blogging the basics [above sample] portraying a simple across the board or “everything goes” redaction sample for readers.

Main purpose is to show for web developers providing a sample of redaction for communication and collaboration with web design, for future consumption.

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Outlook Perspectives

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Outlook Favorites is probably the most useful feature I’ve found in Outlook especially if you have multiple accounts and a lot of rules. And I mean A LOT of rules. I have so many rules I don’t know how many, don’t know how to count them, and don’t care. Mainly because of my use of Search folders, also critical for my email survival, if you will.

The nice thing is that you can add/delete them pretty easily. I’ll address how to add them later in this post but for now, here’s how you delete Favorites in Outlook:

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Clicking on Remove from Favorites takes it off the Favorites sub-pane but you’ll still have the folder. So it’s just a place for shortcuts, basically.

The last rule, I just recently created, is one called Important Mail, shown here:

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***IMPORTANT***: Do NOT use outlook.exe /cleanrules until you export your rules. I’m not sure if the 2013 version of Outlook handles any kind of auto-backup of rules but from my experience it’s important. Especially when it’s a common troubleshooting step used in your organization. Basically, if you use Outlook at work, back ‘em up! But it’s good to backup rules anytime, for obvious (backup) reasons (backup).

Click on the Manage Rules & Alerts… command found under the Rules sub-menu under the Home tab

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In the Rules and Alerts dialog box click Options:

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Click Export Rules…

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Name it the default, just for a test run:

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Save in the default location

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Now that the rules are backed up, put that feather in your cap for when someone asks you to do /cleanrules. Just in case you forget to back them up, you should have that there for risk management purposes.

Now that Rules backup is out of the way, it’s pretty simple to create the Search folder I added to Favorites:

Under the Folder tab click New Search Folder:

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Click on Important Mail and click the OK button

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You should now have it under Search Folders in the left pane:

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Drag that up into the Favorites section of the left navigation pane by clicking on Important Mail and dragging it up to the Favorites area until you get it in between [the folders] where you need it to go:

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Once you have it there then release the left mouse button (primary button for you lefties out there).

For more information on Outlook favorites, rules, and search folders look it up in Outlook Help by pressing F1 or clicking on the question mark in the upper right:

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Meaning of rel tags. Which rel tag to use when? | Review Of Web

Found this article

Meaning of rel tags. Which rel tag to use when? | Review Of Web

Searching for information on what a rel tag is. I was curious after finding this feature in the Hyperlink dialog you can access simply by highlighting a piece of text [range] and clicking Hyperlink…

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Under the Title field is the Rel field:

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Just thought I’d share.

Connecting a Surface Pro tablet to an LED TV

WP_20130511_025

Photo of my LG 47LV5500 taken in my apartment back on Saturday, ‎May ‎11, ‎2013 at 7:44pm [CST].

MODEL NO./NO. MODELE :  47LV5500-UA

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Searching for how to set this up. I think there’s either an article on this but for now I found this on Microsoft Answers forum on their website.

can i connect my HD TV to a surface tablet – Microsoft Community

Has some links. Will need to research this further and update this post when I have something solid to report.

Right now, all I have found is the landing page for Windows Media Center.

Toolbar command for Live Writer integration with Internet Explorer

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Blog This is the command. Didn’t realize there was a toolbar command for the Blog this in Windows Live Writer command I wrote about earlier.

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In my case I have the Command bar turned on under the Tools menu.

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Tools menu also has command. You can enable the Command bar by right-clicking on the Internet Explorer toolbar area on the top of the application’s title bar.

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Command bar check box.