Gettysburg: Wanted, A Man to Match Robert E. Lee

NewsFeed

Abraham Lincoln was, on balance, an astute judge of character, but now and then he made a mistake. Unfortunately, during the months that led to Gettysburg, those mistakes involved the commanders of the Army of the Potomac. Everyone remarked on what a splendid army it was, well drilled and copiously supplied, yet no one could lead it to a decisive victory. Now it was summer 1863, and Lee’s rebels were once again marching northward through the picturesque valleys of western Maryland toward Pennsylvania. Lincoln could not afford another mistake.

Ambrose Burnside had been a doozy. What was it about the Rhode Island inventor with the splendidly feline whiskers? Perhaps it was his winning, and entirely justified, modesty that appealed to Lincoln during the summer and fall of 1862, when the President was besieged by regiments of self-promoters. Burnside had, in the early days of the Civil War, a neat…

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7 Ways Telemarketers Get Your Cell Phone Number

Tech

If you’re in the shrinking pool of people who still have a land line, you’re most likely inundated with calls from telemarketers.

But your cell phone is different, right? You may have registered on the FTC’s National Do Not Call Registry and maybe you know regulations exist that limit the ways debt collectors and companies selling things can pester you on your cell phone.

That kind of thinking isn’t grounded in reality and, unfortunately, a growing number of telemarketing companies don’t care about lists and legislation and will harass you with unwanted calls and texts on your mobile phone anyway. In fact, one tech analyst recently estimated as many as 100 billion robocalls—those lacking a human being on the other end—and other solicitations are made to cell phones in the U.S. every year.

But how do telemarketers get your phone number anyway? You might be surprised.

1. You overshare…

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Heavily redesigned Opera exits beta for Windows and OS X

Gigaom

If you’re an Opera desktop user who’s been waiting for the heavily revamped version but doesn’t like to play the beta game, then today’s your lucky day: the Norwegian firm has released the full, finalized version of its browser for Windows and OS X.

The big change here is Opera’s adoption of the WebKit rendering engine and Chromium framework, in lieu of its previous homegrown efforts. This is a compatibility play – WebKit is what powers Safari(s aapl) and Chrome(s goog), so web developers naturally write for it. We’ve already had the Android version of the new Opera, and now it’s on desktop too.

As we explained when the desktop beta (sorry, “Next version”) came out in May, users will find a heavily revamped Speed Dial feature that allows the organization of bookmarks into folders, a Google Currents-like Discover feature, and a read-later facility called Stash.

You can download the…

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