Week in Review #1

Twitter Lists

Nice feature in Twitter is lists. I use it for categorizing and sanity since I follow a lot of accounts on Twitter. I’ve unfollowed a lot of individuals that I didn’t personally know and didn’t get much out of. But I can still add them to a specific list that I can look at later like music or regional news.

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Twitter Lists

Great examples of what you may find in one of my lists:

The first two examples, cited in the bulleted list above, have twitter accounts [URLs] but I put there world wide web website, main landing page, in the hyperlink. To find the Twitter account for TuneIn or Valley News Live you can simply search for the Valley News Live Twitter page and should be in the Bing results. Not sure about Google but either way the search should find it if you cross reference the entity with Twitter [Valley News Live Twitter]. You can also just hit www.twitter.com and search for Valley News Live in the search box in the top of the Twitter webpage you are on. Their site appears to use master pages so any page you hit under Twitter.com with a few exceptions (e.g. online help, developer/API pages) should have the menus and the search bar at the top.

News List

https://twitter.com/APRykhus/news
My Twitter news list

This contains all my news sources that I’ll re-tweet news stories with.

NSA and Snowden

On the latest This Week and Enterprise Tech podcast they tried to downplay the issue and gave some very good reasons why the problem is not an issue for computing professionals. In my opinion, I would agree. However, the business and political landscapes will most undoubtedly change. They also mentioned a few things I took away that were of interest on the information technology side.

  • Tap devices, similar to wire taps but on computers/networks/LANs
  • EFF.org
  • NSA facility in Utah
  • Auditing
  • Storage
  • VoIP

Keeping things strictly, [IT] industry verbiage. All good things so far. Not sure what to say yet about Snowden. I’ve been watching stories all week. Seems that he has no problem appearing on camera. But that’s just my opinion, based on my 30+ years on this planet and 15+ in IT. He may have been encouraged to appear in front of a camera for the world to see. Which is fair I guess. Just not sure why he went to China. But right now that seems to be purely conjecture and anecdotal to assume much at this point.

But the guys on TWiET seemed to calm my nerves about the situation.

Podcast
This Week in Enterprise Tech episode #45: Can you hear me now?

Jobs

Had an interview this week at what appears to be a very good, reputable, business in the area. The job actually came to me through Teksystems but not in the way I was expecting. Another company called Aerotek called me up and had an interview with them. Currently waiting on a callback. I had a hunch that the two companies were affiliated and they were. The only thing I regretted about the [actual] job interview was not having a real-world example of how I knew Active Directory without using a SharePoint example. The only good way to do that is to take a certification test. So that may need to happen.

Grand Forks Bomb Scare

Back page material. But I took interest because there apparently was another one [false alarm] earlier in the month [or two] preceding this one. Came in on the wire last night from Grand Forks. Walmart and another business were evacuated. False alarm. Sounds like the natives [residents] were a little restless last night:

Tweet contains link to page with video
Source

Father’s Day

Tweet:
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U.K. hosts CloudToo next week

 

Found an interesting IT event during my [mostly] daily check-in of my LinkedIn wall and reviewing some companies.

Stumbled on an event taking place next week called CloudToo. This was posted on the [LinkedIn] wall of Doherty Associates in the United Kingdom (U.K.).

Businessweek
World Stock Markets & Stock Index Performance – Businessweek

Seems interesting. Too bad it’s in the U.K. No chance I’ll be able to attend. But does interest me regardless of my availability to commit. I’ll update this post with any videos or content disseminated from the event.

To sign up for the event go to:

http://cloud4sme.eventbrite.com/#

Quote

“Making a brighter future for SME’s and start-ups with the cloud”

SME

The acronym SME typically stands for subject matter expert. The opposite to a SME would be a generalist, or as some call it a jack of all trades. For example, if you’re hiring for a job that must have Apple and Macintosh (Mac) experience then you will post for an Apple genius or Mac expert or Mac genius whatever they call them now these days. Microsoft has an official branding of MVP (Microsoft Valued Professional) but that’s only really a status symbol and special partnership between you and the company. It’s kind of like the MCP program for certification. There’s some tests that you just pass that one test and you’re MCP.

You can check the Apple or Microsoft sites to see what kind of programs they have for SMEs or IT Professionals.

MSDN and TechNet are the Microsoft channels for professionals. I think the Mac genius program would cover that but it’s just assuming. Mac is about 10% of my breadth of knowledge and experience and only with hypercard on the old Macs in the late ‘80s and the Apple II/c in the mid-80s.

Podcast for IT Professionals

This Week in Enterprise Tech on TWiT.TV is a great weekly podcast covering technology trends in the enterprise with a panel of key contributors. Some remote via IPTV. Some in studio with the presenter.

The presenter also has a blog called TheTechStop.

The Podcast [metro] app, available from the Microsoft Store app in Windows 8, is what I use typically to watch these. Although if you go to the Podcasts section of the Libraries node in the navigation pane of Windows Explorer also known as File Explorer in Windows 8.

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Libraries node in Navigation Pane

Here you’ll find the actual MPG, WMV, AVI, etc, file that you can play in Windows Media Player or whatever application you have associated to play the relevant video file.

Continue reading

Social Media diagram

Case Study: Guide to Business & Social Media Rockstar | Infographics | Customer Service Innovation | Scoop.it
Your Social Media Roots

Site that I snagged this from was from Scoop.it! Not sure about the name but it also has a link on Pinterest as well.

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Screenshot of the Scoop.it! website loaded in Internet Explorer 10 (desktop) logged in to the site with my Facebook account

Action Center automatically checking for driver updates

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Notification Area

I got a message in the notification area that there was some kind of scheduled event running.

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Action Center icon when no current issues are detected

Hovering over the Action Center icon will invoke a tooltip stating “no current issues detected”:

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Tooltip

Action Center

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Screenshot

Software Update

Software that got updated was interesting:

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After the update completed the Microsoft Mouse and Keyboard Center appears.

So far, everything is working fine.

Cross-site scripting message in notification bar

Very common message. I’ve been seeing this for a while. Pops up at the bottom of the Internet Explorer window. In the notification bar.

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The hyperlink (URL) that I had opened to trigger the above message is the following:

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/other-gadgets/10-gadgets-that-will-make-dads-day.htm

I’m pretty sure that http://www.howstuffworks.com or http://howstuffworks.com (without the www.) was added to the Trusted Sites zone but fairly certain that http://electronics.howstuffworks.com is not.

I tried adding the following URL to the Trusted Sites zone in Internet Explorer 10.

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com

imageTools, Internet Options, Security tab, Trusted Sites, Sites, Add button

In my case, the address http://electronics.howstuffworks.com is pre-populated (already there) in the Add this website to the zone box. So I just had to click the Add button and the Close button in the lower right of the Trusted Sites dialog box.

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Then OK:

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Result
Same message

Internet Explorer has modified this page to help prevent cross-site scripting.


If you’re in a corporate, locked down environment, the only thing you can do at this point is modify the Internet Explorer settings. But many organizations do control or govern their systems, including Windows and its native web browsing application, Internet Explorer. The best thing I can offer to any end-user (information worker) having this message is to simply click on the x on the right of the message bar at the bottom of Internet Explorer.

Search

Bing

internet explorer 9 messages at bottom

Answer

Internet Explorer 9 Notification bar: frequently asked questions

Can I ignore notifications?

Yes. The bar might be displayed until you navigate to a new webpage or click the Close button. For notifications involving security or privacy, Internet Explorer automatically takes the most secure action, and allows you to take less secure actions if you’re confident they won’t put your computer or information in danger.

Solution

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Click the x to ignore the message and close the notification bar. The bar should [I think] also simply close itself if you do nothing, within like 5-10 seconds.

Forum

Microsoft Answers

How do I prevent Internet Explorer from modifying pages for cross-site scripting? Under the security tab for IE8 there is a new Scripting Section for XSS Filter, Disable it and the issue goes away.

 

I don’t ever touch this setting unless there’s some business justification or an RFP (request for proposal) outlining why it’s feasible to disable that setting. However, if you’re not at work and just in the context of a home computer, not used for business, then I’d suggest do it only if you understand what it does.

For more on the [Cross Site Scripting] XSS Filter, read the following articles:

More Information


MSDN Library

Event 1046 – Cross-Site Scripting Filter

Administrators


Windows Help

Cross-site scripting filter

Information workers, home, and end-users